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Dating a 514 Remington Single Shot


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#1 Pdwight

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Posted 01 February 2007 - 05:15 PM

I have a buddy who has a 514 with no designation after the model number and no S/N



The date code is "AW5" on the barrel can you tell me the date ??



Thanks

Dwight
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#2 Carl

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Posted 01 February 2007 - 08:05 PM

I have a buddy who has a 514 with no designation after the model number and no S/N



The date code is "AW5" on the barrel can you tell me the date ??



Thanks

Dwight



Hmmmm???.... doesn't match up does it? Does your friend know any history of the rifle? The "5" would indicate it was built for employee sale. A WW would make sense for 1950 and A would be March, but a single W would only make sense here if it were built for an employee in 1972 using left over parts. Is that a possibility? Also, if it were made from a "parts cleanup", it may have just been stamped with a 5 for that purpose. Then again, "thinking as I type", in 1972 it should be serial numbered.... as I said at first... Hmmmm???!!! Very interesting!!
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#3 Pdwight

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Posted 01 February 2007 - 09:41 PM

Hmmmm???.... doesn't match up does it? Does your friend know any history of the rifle? The "5" would indicate it was built for employee sale. A WW would make sense for 1950 and A would be March, but a single W would only make sense here if it were built for an employee in 1972 using left over parts. Is that a possibility? Also, if it were made from a "parts cleanup", it may have just been stamped with a 5 for that purpose. Then again, "thinking as I type", in 1972 it should be serial numbered.... as I said at first... Hmmmm???!!! Very interesting!!





I went back and checked it with a Lupe and it is marked AW 5 so the 5 does not match the font or the AW really, also the trigger is not just a curved piece of metal it looks kinda fancy like its been rolled so that if you cut a cross section out it would almost make a "T" withe the top of the "T: being the part where you finger rested........or picture a little "I" beam with the bottom of the "I" gone and formed into a trigger.
A hundred years from now it will not matter what my bank account was, the sort of house I lived in, or the kind of car I drove. But the world may be different, because I was important in the life of a child.

for Zach, Everett, and Lilly

#4 Carl

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Posted 01 February 2007 - 11:26 PM

I went back and checked it with a Lupe and it is marked AW 5 so the 5 does not match the font or the AW really, also the trigger is not just a curved piece of metal it looks kinda fancy like its been rolled so that if you cut a cross section out it would almost make a "T" withe the top of the "T: being the part where you finger rested........or picture a little "I" beam with the bottom of the "I" gone and formed into a trigger.



Are you sure the 3rd digit isn't an "S". There was often a difference in the style or size of the letters. W would match for the month (August) and if it's an S it would be 1969. Usually the first letter was, I believe, the production supervisor stamp and the second and third (and 4th if it was a double letter... WW, ZZ) were the date. As I said, the month and year letters were not always the same, did not always line up, etc.

However, sometimes there was a number for the last digit and it would indicate things like: 2- replacement barrel, 3- Service repair, 4- returned without repair, and 5- employee sale. It seems though, that over the years the system varied a little. Again, if it is 1968 or newer, it should be serial numbered.
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#5 douglas34474

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Posted 06 February 2007 - 03:33 PM

I also have a 514 with no date or serial number.

On the left of the barrel, just in front of the receiver, is stamped "EEO". The 'O' is larger than the 'EE' and the top of the 'O' does not look complete.

Any idea of date?

What would one of these be worth in very good condition?

#6 Carl

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Posted 06 February 2007 - 05:06 PM

I also have a 514 with no date or serial number.

On the left of the barrel, just in front of the receiver, is stamped "EEO". The 'O' is larger than the 'EE' and the top of the 'O' does not look complete.

Any idea of date?

What would one of these be worth in very good condition?



As I said earlier, Remington seemed to change up their methods at times. I'd guess it's EE or Oct.'58. Usually the first letter is not the date, but I have rifles that the first one is the month.

As for value... like most rifles the price has gotten ahead of the Blue Book in most places... I'd say it still takes an almost perfect example to be worth $135-140... a very nice one should be around $120. They have their weaknesses, but like most Remingtons, have good barrels and are decent shooters.
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restrain the people; it is an instrument for the


people to restrain the government-lest it come to


dominate our lives and interests"


Patrick Henry

#7 Pdwight

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Posted 06 February 2007 - 05:29 PM

Next Question



I cleaned the rifle up for my friend, the barrel looked great. I put a replacement but plate on the gun and fit it using a belt sander. The gun really looked good when it was done...thsi model dos not have the slickest bolt in the industry. Well he brought out his brothers gun that they have had in their family as long as he can remember....of course he is only 26 (Oh to be 26 again). This is a Remington Model 33 with no designation at the end of the model number. It does have a S/N. My Blue Book says 1932-35 ?? is this correct ???



Thanks for all the help Carl....we need to start a Technical section for some of this info.



Dwight
A hundred years from now it will not matter what my bank account was, the sort of house I lived in, or the kind of car I drove. But the world may be different, because I was important in the life of a child.

for Zach, Everett, and Lilly

#8 Carl

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Posted 07 February 2007 - 06:25 AM

Next Question

This is a Remington Model 33 with no designation at the end of the model number. It does have a S/N. My Blue Book says 1932-35 ?? is this correct ???

Dwight



The 33 came out in July of 1931... the "Boys Rifle" was discontinued in '35 and the standard model in '36.

Carl
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#9 douglas34474

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Posted 07 February 2007 - 01:51 PM

Thank you Carl.

Just after I posted my question I found the sticky to Remington info. :blush:

I guess I did good then. I gave $75.00 for the one I have. Metal looks like 95% or better. The bolt does show some use, but not bad.

I stripped off the varnish someone had put on it and did a raw linseed oil treatment. Looks great.

#10 Carl

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Posted 07 February 2007 - 02:23 PM

Thank you Carl.

I stripped off the varnish someone had put on it and did a raw linseed oil treatment. Looks great.



Are you sure it was raw linseed oil?.... it doesn't dry. Boiled linseed oil drys overnight... raw drys much slower, and then will soften and get sticky in the heat and humidity, or from handling.

My wife used to teach tole painting and exibited and sold paintings. She recommended mixing turpintine (the oderless kind is best if you don't want the smell everywhere) with BLO to thin it for the first few coats so it soaks in and seals deeper. Then more coats straight for the finish.... works great. I rub it in with my fingers because the warmth helps it penetrate even more.
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#11 douglas34474

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Posted 08 February 2007 - 10:07 AM

BLO is great for mixing with paint. And I know many use it for stocks.

But I also shoot USGI rifles. All of them are treated with RAW LINSEED OIL. Thats the way they left the factory.

All I have ever used on stocks was raw linseed. It is all in how you use it.

You use a very small amount; just enough to dampen a clean rag. Rub it into wood over a small area. Keep working until the entire stock is treated. Let the stock set for 1 or 2 hours, then wipe off the excess and polish with a clean cloth.

I do my stocks about every six months. I have been using the same 16 oz. can for somewhere around 20 years.




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