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Marlin Glenfield Model 60 Feed issues


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#1 Paladin1701

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Posted 14 March 2010 - 03:51 PM

Hello,

I working on getting my Dad's Glenfield Model 60 Rifle up and running. (This is the rifle I grew up using).
The rifle hasn't been shot in the last 8 years or so but as far as he remembers it was in working order the last time that he used it.

I decided that the first thing that I should do is to clean it. I downloaded the manual from the manufactures web page and broke the rifle down as far as the manual recommended. I.E. i didn;t break the action down just removed it along with the bolt, charging handle, etc. I also brushed and cleaned out the barrel.

I cleaned and lubricated it using a Hopper 9 rimfire cleaning kit.

The manual seemed to indicate that only the action needed oiled. I put a light coat on the bolt and other parts as well.

After reassembling the rifle I attempted to load in a few rounds of ammunition via the feeder tube. Each time that I attempt to use the charging handle to load a round the rifle jams. Looking at it closely and cycling the charging handle slowly it appears that the left (inside) extractor is not catching the round of ammunition. Since the right extractor is catching it is causing the round to sway toward the ejection port instead of into the chamber.

I broke down the rifle and inspected the extractor's. Both are still spring tensioned and appear to rotate correctly. The onlything i noticed is that the left extractor appears to be more worn the the right extractor. The lip/hook of the left extractor appears to be more rounded then the right one.

I'm thinking I need a new extractor but wanted to run it by someone else first as I have never broken down this rifle before.

If the extractor is a logical place to start should I just replace the extractor or should I go ahead and replace the spring and pin as well?

Should I also replace the right extractor while I'm at it?

Is this replacement hard to do?

Where is the best/cheapest place to obtain parts?

The rifle's Serial number starts with 26 so it appears to have been built in 1974. It has the squirrel engravings behind the trigger. The action is held in by screws in the front and a pin and screw in the back. Can I assume that I can go by the Model 60 parts list as opposed to the list for Model 60's with succeeding letters such as DL, C, etc?


One other think I noticed is that the Buffer appears to be cracking around where it connects to the action. Not sure if that should be replaced as it appears to require breakdown of the action which I don't want to do.

Thanks for any assistance you can provide.

#2 LongPlay

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Posted 14 March 2010 - 06:00 PM

These little rifles can be really good fun, and accurate as well.

I think they are also inexpensive enough to not bother trying to change small parts on.

Here is a link to Brownells page with the whole bolt assembly, intact. http://www.brownells...ETE__POST_06_04

It should be a drop in, and solve the function problem. AFTER you have the old bolt replaced and the rifle is up and running to your satisfaction,
you can THEN take the bolt apart at your leisure and learn all about it, fix it if need be, and keep the older one for a spare to pass down with the
rifle to the kids. I find the same kinds of things with the Ruger 1022's. If you want aftermarket and upscale parts, yes, they can be expensive.
But for about 45 dollars, you can replace the bolt on a Ruger also!! as long as you want stock parts.

Brownells has a lot of good parts. it did take me several tries to learn to use their new search methods. But wading through the 40 pages of parts that it
was bringing up was sometimes fun, just to learn what kinds of things they carry.

Enjoy... should shoot well into the NEXT century if well kept....(if they dont take them all away from us!!)
:blush:

By the way!!! Welcome to RFS site. Get a cup of coffee and read and post a while. Great tons of knowledge here, and lots of good fun.
This site is the most friendly and best run I have found... stay a while, and lets know what else you shoot...

Edited by LongPlay, 14 March 2010 - 06:03 PM.


#3 Carl

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Posted 15 March 2010 - 03:53 AM

I am not familiar with the model 60, but it's normal for most rifles to have a difference in the right and left extractor. The left has to have less of a hook so when the bolt goes back far enough for the case to hit the ejector, it will "pop" out of the left extractor. If you get them reversed or replace a left with a right, they will hang up and not eject. I would look for another problem... maybe your cleaning flushed a little contaminant under the left extractor that is holding it out a little... wouldn't take much.
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#4 Paladin1701

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Posted 16 March 2010 - 10:51 PM

I am not familiar with the model 60, but it's normal for most rifles to have a difference in the right and left extractor. The left has to have less of a hook so when the bolt goes back far enough for the case to hit the ejector, it will "pop" out of the left extractor. If you get them reversed or replace a left with a right, they will hang up and not eject. I would look for another problem... maybe your cleaning flushed a little contaminant under the left extractor that is holding it out a little... wouldn't take much.


Hello, thanks for the response. I checked the extractor and couldn't find any contaminant that seemed like it would cause an issue. Any other thoughts?

#5 Paladin1701

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Posted 16 March 2010 - 10:55 PM

These little rifles can be really good fun, and accurate as well.

I think they are also inexpensive enough to not bother trying to change small parts on.

Here is a link to Brownells page with the whole bolt assembly, intact. http://www.brownells...ETE__POST_06_04

It should be a drop in, and solve the function problem. AFTER you have the old bolt replaced and the rifle is up and running to your satisfaction,
you can THEN take the bolt apart at your leisure and learn all about it, fix it if need be, and keep the older one for a spare to pass down with the
rifle to the kids. I find the same kinds of things with the Ruger 1022's. If you want aftermarket and upscale parts, yes, they can be expensive.
But for about 45 dollars, you can replace the bolt on a Ruger also!! as long as you want stock parts.

Brownells has a lot of good parts. it did take me several tries to learn to use their new search methods. But wading through the 40 pages of parts that it
was bringing up was sometimes fun, just to learn what kinds of things they carry.

Enjoy... should shoot well into the NEXT century if well kept....(if they dont take them all away from us!!)
:blush:

By the way!!! Welcome to RFS site. Get a cup of coffee and read and post a while. Great tons of knowledge here, and lots of good fun.
This site is the most friendly and best run I have found... stay a while, and lets know what else you shoot...



Hi, I like this forum. Thanks for the warm welcome. I also have an old J stevens Springfiled single shot bolt action. Can't quite make out the model number other then it starts with a 1. You have to manually pull the bolt back to before you can fire. It was my Grandpa's gun and is probably a 1920's or 1930's era weapon I think.

I have looked for info on it but not much luck. About all I can find info on is a Model 15 but the pictures don't seem to jive with what I have.

#6 LongPlay

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Posted 17 March 2010 - 07:43 AM

Hi, I like this forum. Thanks for the warm welcome. I also have an old J stevens Springfiled single shot bolt action. Can't quite make out the model number other then it starts with a 1. You have to manually pull the bolt back to before you can fire. It was my Grandpa's gun and is probably a 1920's or 1930's era weapon I think.

I have looked for info on it but not much luck. About all I can find info on is a Model 15 but the pictures don't seem to jive with what I have.


I read something about a rifle like this just last week. I cannot remember where exactly, but it was a bit humorous as the topic of the maker building an answer to a question no one ever asked!!
It is called a semi Auto single shot rifle I think... I will go back to my reading areas, and see if I can find the post. It had some good reference info with it, that could help you identify your rifle.

If possible, see if you can get a photo and post it up and I am sure several of our Marling experts here will give you the long and more detailed answer to your question... lots of good info floating out here on this site....

If you have not posted pics before, and need help, just PM me and I will see if I can walk you through it. Also there is a post discussing how to post pics here.

Edited by LongPlay, 17 March 2010 - 07:44 AM.


#7 douglas34474

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Posted 28 April 2010 - 08:30 AM

Hello,

After reassembling the rifle I attempted to load in a few rounds of ammunition via the feeder tube. Each time that I attempt to use the charging handle to load a round the rifle jams. Looking at it closely and cycling the charging handle slowly it appears that the left (inside) extractor is not catching the round of ammunition. Since the right extractor is catching it is causing the round to sway toward the ejection port instead of into the chamber.


This rifle is famous for failures of the feed block. The extractors do not guide the round into the chamber.

I broke down the rifle and inspected the extractor's. Both are still spring tensioned and appear to rotate correctly. The onlything i noticed is that the left extractor appears to be more worn the the right extractor. The lip/hook of the left extractor appears to be more rounded then the right one.


There is nothing wrong with the extractors.

One other think I noticed is that the Buffer appears to be cracking around where it connects to the action. Not sure if that should be replaced as it appears to require breakdown of the action which I don't want to do.

Thanks for any assistance you can provide.


Replace the buffer. When they start cracking they need to be replaced.

#8 YOUR_LANDLORD

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Posted 15 November 2011 - 04:23 AM

I've had several problems like this with my dad's model 60 while i've been trying to get it cleaned up and functioning. I noticed that the only time I would have a failure to feed was when I loaded the first round, and only when I tried to ride the charging handle down gently, opposed to letting it slam home. I loaded a few rounds in the tube and watched closely, and I saw as the bolt was closing, the round would get hung at the top of the feed ramp. The pressure of the bolt closing would cause it to pop free, throwing the round out at an angle, causing a jam. Check it out and see if yours is doing the same, although I don't know how to fix it.

#9 jeeperatt1

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Posted 09 December 2011 - 08:36 PM

I too had this problem and sadly had to return my old 60 from where I got it. I took it apart and cleaned it thoroughly. Put it back together and when I went to load it the round would pop out, every time! If I let the bolt go fast it would actually jam and not load in the chamber. If I rode the bolt the round would pop out!!

No idea what it could have been. Strange thing is when I took it back my dealer had another one just like it. Loaded a round and darn if it didn't pop out of that one as well.

Anyone that has a clue to what problem may have please chime in. I like these older autos and really want to pick another one up. But if I run into the problem again I would like to know what's causing it.

Thanks

Edited by jeeperatt1, 09 December 2011 - 08:37 PM.


#10 payne

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Posted 28 December 2011 - 01:45 PM

Resize_P12-27-11_19-4611000007.jpg Hi,
Im new to this forum, this issue with the feeding problem on the Marlin 60 has caught my eye because I just purchased one of the older models from a local pawn shop. It is I believe a 1977 model, has the 18 round tubular magazine, and the 22 inch barrel.
I love the look and feel of this rifle. It looked pretty bad when I bought it but I have brought it back to life with some TLC.I am having this same feeding issue. If I look in the reciever while it is loading it appears to throw the bullet up to high awkardly to the left or right. If I let is slam closed it seems to more often than not line up and send the bullet home properly. I have cleaned it very well and think this may have solved the problem but was wondering if anyone was going to respond to this prior comment with some knowledge beyond mine. I have included a pic of my rifle. I am still refinishing it with some colonial maple stain, that had not been installed in this pick, I had only stripped it with some citri strip at this point. Thank You.

#11 jaia

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Posted 28 December 2011 - 04:24 PM

My old Marlin 60 didn't like operating in slow motion.
Attempting to work the action slowly would cause jams and misfeeds.
Snapping the bolt back and releasing it quickly, made it feed properly.
Once I'd learned that particular idiosyncrasy and gave up bulk Winchester and Remington
the rifle never gave me any other problems. Don't forget to clean out the buildup/deposits
in the extractor grooves alongside the firing chamber. Keeps the extractors from closing.
I've had that mess with extractions too. :blush:

Edited by jaia, 28 December 2011 - 04:26 PM.

jaia...just another interested amateur

#12 brl4587

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Posted 28 December 2011 - 08:18 PM

I just bought one of these model 60's at a local pawn shop for $20. It has the older stock with the squirrel on it which is in good condition, but the action and the barrel are in very rough shape. The rifle will fire one shot, extract the empty, but will jam the next round as it loads into the chamber. Anyone have any idea on how to fix this problem?

#13 jaia

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Posted 29 December 2011 - 06:32 AM

Every time my old 60 would fail to cycle,
it was a heads up telling me it was time for a thorough cleaning.
The action is very simple, very durable, but is subject to blowback fouling.
GSR buildup on the insides of the receiver slow the bolt down, lead buildup
and GSR on the ramp deflect the rounds from chambering, fouling in the extractor grooves
and on the face and sides of the bolt prevent the extractors from functioning.
Take it apart, clean it, then clean it again until all that's left, in the action, is the original metal and paint.
Solves all the problems I've had except those caused by mechanical failure.(broken spring)

Edited by jaia, 29 December 2011 - 06:46 AM.

jaia...just another interested amateur

#14 jaia

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Posted 29 December 2011 - 06:44 AM

Worst case, you might replace the trigger/feed assembly, but I doubt that's needed.

Edited by jaia, 29 December 2011 - 06:46 AM.

jaia...just another interested amateur

#15 millwrightmonkey

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Posted 16 February 2012 - 10:19 AM

Hello

I am going thru this stage also. I have an old Coast to Coast by Marlin that will not feed. I found the feed throat had worn thru on both sides ( inside ). The rounds would catch in these and throw the rounds out causing jams and ruining bullets.

The repair is to replace the feed throat, ejector spring and grind the tab off the lift finger for clearance or replace with new style also. This will get it feeding again. Next comes adjusting the ejector spring. I use a nickle for a standard, lay the nickle on the feed throat and adjust to just slide under then use the nickle verticaly to adjust for same clearance as before. This may vary between guns so some variation is required. Fire to test, adjust as needed.

Charlie




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