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savage 187s


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#1 carbon22

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Posted 22 December 2009 - 07:12 PM

i need help with history on the savage/springfeild 187s.im not able to find out much online so if any one has any info and pics it would be much apreciated.i just purchased a nice 187s for 50 bucks and would like to know more about it.the best i can tell is that it was made in the 60s or 70s.

#2 Carl

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Posted 23 December 2009 - 08:43 AM

i need help with history on the savage/springfeild 187s.im not able to find out much online so if any one has any info and pics it would be much apreciated.i just purchased a nice 187s for 50 bucks and would like to know more about it.the best i can tell is that it was made in the 60s or 70s.



If I'm not mistaken, this Savage/Springfield/Stevens semi-auto line started with the Model 6 Savage and there were a multitude of model numbers and variations throughout the years, from the late '30s thru the late '60s. Someone should be along soon to give better information on this classic design.
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#3 Tigerbeetle

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Posted 28 December 2009 - 01:10 PM

If I'm not mistaken, this Savage/Springfield/Stevens semi-auto line started with the Model 6 Savage and there were a multitude of model numbers and variations throughout the years, from the late '30s thru the late '60s. Someone should be along soon to give better information on this classic design.


These were neat old rifles. I just gave one to my granddaughter for a Christmas present. They had seveal nicknames. Many of them had from 1 or 2 to as many as 5 small slits (or gills) cut out on the left side of the receiver chamber. The one I gave my granddaughter had 2. Some of them also had a whole cut through the receiver which allowed the bolt handle to be pushed in, which would lock the bolt open. Mine was labeled as a Savage/Glenfield which was sold by Sears Robuck and co. I believe. As near as I could determine mine was made around 1950 give or take a year or two. Birch stock which refinished very nicely. Oh, and another unique aspect of the rifle. It also had the moniker as the "klickety-Klack." If the trigger was held in the recessed position after the shot, the bolt would be held open. Once the finger was released from the trigger, it would load the next round into battery for another shot. Thus by slowly releasing the trigger you could get a klickety-klack rythum out of the action. These were fine shooting guns used for the harvest of lots and lots of squirrels and rabbits throughout the midwest and most everywhere else I would imagine.

You may find a lot of additional info on rimfirecentral.com in the Savage forum. Do a search on the Mdl 187s, Mdl 6 or any of the other key words. You should also be able to match up your serial number and determine what year it was made in. Enjoy the rifle. It will outlast you. Oh, one other thing, (and I may be confusing this with the Marlin Mdl 60) don't take the action apart until you have researched it pretty well. It may be a real bear to get back together. TB
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The two "gill" slits are visible in this picture.

#4 rjmorel

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Posted 28 January 2010 - 02:43 PM

Tigerbeetle, I have one of these rifles marked Western Field 836R which I believe is like a Savage 187N. I love it's "klickety-Klack" which reminds me of a mini-14 bolt. Anyways my question is : should I be able to rapid fire it w/o it jamming up. If I pull the trigger and wait a second then release the trigger it will release the bolt and feed and fire all day long. If I try rapid firing , it will not feed sometimes and sometimes not cock the firing pin so when I pull the trigger it just goes click. I bought it knowing it had problems but once I figured out to slow down on resetting the trigger it shoots great and accurate. It doesn't look like it had much use from previous owner. I doused the action with gun cleaner and lube and cycled it a bunch by hand to try and get it clean and lubed all over inside to see if something was to dry and not able to function like it should. I'm asking if this is how it should normally operate or is there something hanging up that prevents it from working in a rapid fire fashion? I read about another person having one and his would rapid fire just fine. Thanks for any thoughs you may have . It is a very nice plinker for the money, rj

#5 simongirty

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Posted 22 March 2010 - 09:29 PM

These were neat old rifles. I just gave one to my granddaughter for a Christmas present. They had seveal nicknames. Many of them had from 1 or 2 to as many as 5 small slits (or gills) cut out on the left side of the receiver chamber. The one I gave my granddaughter had 2. Some of them also had a whole cut through the receiver which allowed the bolt handle to be pushed in, which would lock the bolt open. Mine was labeled as a Savage/Glenfield which was sold by Sears Robuck and co. I believe. As near as I could determine mine was made around 1950 give or take a year or two. Birch stock which refinished very nicely. Oh, and another unique aspect of the rifle. It also had the moniker as the "klickety-Klack." If the trigger was held in the recessed position after the shot, the bolt would be held open. Once the finger was released from the trigger, it would load the next round into battery for another shot. Thus by slowly releasing the trigger you could get a klickety-klack rythum out of the action. These were fine shooting guns used for the harvest of lots and lots of squirrels and rabbits throughout the midwest and most everywhere else I would imagine.

You may find a lot of additional info on rimfirecentral.com in the Savage forum. Do a search on the Mdl 187s, Mdl 6 or any of the other key words. You should also be able to match up your serial number and determine what year it was made in. Enjoy the rifle. It will outlast you. Oh, one other thing, (and I may be confusing this with the Marlin Mdl 60) don't take the action apart until you have researched it pretty well. It may be a real bear to get back together. TB
Posted Image

Posted Image

Posted Image

The two "gill" slits are visible in this picture.

This is awesome!! I just bought one yesterday and never knew about the way to lock the bolt open !! Thanks a million!! Mine does not have any serial numbers on it anywhere nor does it have any place where it looks like its been altered. I really didn't think this gun was old enough not to have numbers, some of my older .22 don't because they where manufactured before they where required. I have noticed this rifle is real picky about the type of ammo it will cycle properly. Bulk Federals in the 550 box don't run so well through it. I have got some Winchester bulk 555 count that runs good and of coarse the CCI mini-mags also run well. Also th etabs that hold the bullet in place as it comes up and out of the tube into the chamber must be adjusted just right or the bolt will hang up on it as it tries to feed the incoming round. Thanks for the post!




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