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glue for base and scope rings


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#1 toopointer

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Posted 04 December 2006 - 03:37 PM

I have used Loctite Removable #242 blue for years. I just don't remember what I used to clean the screw threads and holes before I screwed the base down. I have some rubbing alcohol here, would that work good enough to clean everything before using the loctite ?? Thanks for imput. Better now than after screwing
the base down and having it come loose, after getting it sighting in .
too

#2 Pdwight

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Posted 04 December 2006 - 05:21 PM

I have used Loctite Removable #242 blue for years. I just don't remember what I used to clean the screw threads and holes before I screwed the base down. I have some rubbing alcohol here, would that work good enough to clean everything before using the loctite ?? Thanks for imput. Better now than after screwing
the base down and having it come loose, after getting it sighting in .
too





Denatured Alcohol is good as is Acetone or Gun scrubber applied with a "Q" tip not sprayed directly on the gun, then take the time to use a hair dryer and dry the solvent before you apply the screws...you will see how dry the metal is after you do this.



Dwight
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for Zach, Everett, and Lilly

#3 Niagarafallss1

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Posted 05 December 2006 - 06:09 PM

Carb cleaner is a fine degreaser also :)

Just be sure it ONLY gets on the threads. It's often not firearm finish friendly.

Edited by Niagarafallss1, 05 December 2006 - 06:11 PM.


#4 toopointer

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Posted 05 December 2006 - 06:17 PM

Thanks guys, I got my Savage today, and will mount my scope base and rings tomorrow, appreciate your help :D Carb cleaner I have !!
too

Edited by toopointer, 06 December 2006 - 09:29 AM.


#5 gmcfixer

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Posted 21 January 2007 - 01:13 PM

I guess I'm a little late on the thread but keep in mind some carb cleaner sprays leave a residue. Not all of them do so you never know.

Dave Z

#6 Pdwight

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Posted 21 January 2007 - 01:21 PM

I guess I'm a little late on the thread but keep in mind some carb cleaner sprays leave a residue. Not all of them do so you never know.

Dave Z





A very good point Dave, if it is a really nasty gun I am cleaning I will often use Card Cleaner (Non Chlorinated type) and when the gun or part is clean a quick spray with Gun Scrubber will leave it residue free. The Gun Scrubber costs much more and their is a good way to only use it when you need it. People that don't think Carb Cleaner leaves a residue should try spraying a clean piece of glass with it and let it dry and look...you will be surprised.



Gun Scrubber or Acetone will not.



Dwight
A hundred years from now it will not matter what my bank account was, the sort of house I lived in, or the kind of car I drove. But the world may be different, because I was important in the life of a child.

for Zach, Everett, and Lilly

#7 Educator

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Posted 21 January 2007 - 01:30 PM

This is late as well...but...denatured alcohol is different from rubbing alcohol. I use the denatured alcohol a lot to mix with the rosin for the rings and it does a good job of cleaning the threads too. I'm not sure you can get denatured alcohol at the normal places. I buy mine from a pharmacy.
Dwight

#8 gmcfixer

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Posted 21 January 2007 - 05:15 PM

Once again very good point about the difference in denatured and rubbing! I generally follow carb cleaners with denatured alcohol and that has worked well for me. BTW if you are reusing the screws don't forget to clean them too! Regular good old blue (medium strength) lock tite is perfect for scope bases, it really doesn't matter what type of gun it is. Even the 577 T-rex doesn't need any more than that since its not the locktite that is withstanding the recoil, all the locktite does is fill the gaps in the threads. Hope that helps.

Dave Z

#9 Sleeping Dog

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Posted 25 January 2007 - 10:19 AM

I guess I'm a little late on the thread but keep in mind some carb cleaner sprays leave a residue. Not all of them do so you never know.

Dave Z

I use a spray can of brake cleaner. It doesn't seem to leave any residue.

#10 Luisyamaha

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Posted 25 January 2007 - 07:27 PM

Lacquer thinner.

#11 Jim McCoin

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Posted 25 January 2007 - 07:43 PM

I haven't used any for some time, but there used to be a Loctite primer for use with the different colored adhesives. It was normally applied with a Qtip or tooth pick. I'm sure you can buy it the same place you buy the adhesive.

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#12 toopointer

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Posted 29 January 2007 - 12:35 PM

Thanks for all the info :tumbs:
too

#13 langenc

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Posted 07 February 2007 - 01:38 PM

Just clean the threads with rubbing alcohol and dont worry about residue. Then a drop of fingernail polish and the screws will never come out esp w/ 22. I do the same on centerfire and have never had a wiggler. Locktite is overkill.

Edited by langenc, 07 February 2007 - 01:39 PM.


#14 Carl

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Posted 07 February 2007 - 02:05 PM

Used a lot of different Loctites when I worked and attended a couple of their seminars. I'm a big believer in the blue removable threadlocker. I have found that the threads don't need t be squeeky clean or primed for that particular Loctite. If you want the stronger versions to do their best, the better prepared the surface, the stronger they are.
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#15 Pdwight

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Posted 07 February 2007 - 02:39 PM

I have to agree with Carl, the Blue Locktite is a known quantity that will produce repeatable results. Fingernail polish is ....Who knows what............I bet if tested you would find a big variation in the chemical makeup of the different types. And with Blue Locktite and a heat gun it comes right off.



Dwight
A hundred years from now it will not matter what my bank account was, the sort of house I lived in, or the kind of car I drove. But the world may be different, because I was important in the life of a child.

for Zach, Everett, and Lilly

#16 gmcfixer

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Posted 07 February 2007 - 08:29 PM

I'll add a some more to the topic here. Considering how much I use Locktite in my profession (several times a day at times) I do have some good working knowledge of the blue and red locktite. Blue is medium strength and should not require heat for removal, red which is high stregnth does require heat for removal. But as small as the screws on scope mounts are and as easy as it is to strip them out it wouldn't hurt at all to use a hair dryer (blow dryer) to warm things up. I would also ad that if you have hollow ground screwdrivers they work much better and also prevent striping of the head of the fastener, most screwdrivers that use inserts such as the racheting types have hollow ground bits. If you look at the side of the tip of the bit or screwdriver it will be concave rather than flat and that is the easiest way to tell. Also keep in mind many synthetic oils disolve locktite. Blue Locktite works by filling gaps in the threads that allow vibration that causes the fastener to loosen, the red does the same but also has adheasive properties. There are other grades of Locktite but red and blue are the common ones that are used more than any others. BTW I also agree with those saying blue Locktite is more than enough for a scope mount. I hope that all is helpful.

Dave Z

#17 Pdwight

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Posted 07 February 2007 - 08:39 PM

A great post, Thanks Dave



Dwight



I forgot to mention that the reason I use heat is due to the size of most screws in guns...I have found if I get the part around 100 deg. F or just warm enough it will be uncomfortable on the back of my hand the screw will come right out. I used to use Red on my 38 Super Compensator and when removing that I used the oven so I could get it the right temp. I also think (FWIW) that vibration is the largest enemy...most folks do not realize how much space or "slop" there is in screw threads.
A hundred years from now it will not matter what my bank account was, the sort of house I lived in, or the kind of car I drove. But the world may be different, because I was important in the life of a child.

for Zach, Everett, and Lilly

#18 clint

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Posted 07 February 2007 - 08:53 PM

I would also just like to add

I have used finger nail polish at times, when I can't find my blue goo.. There is a huge amount of slop between the threads , and something else people may not know is the mounting screws for scope bases are very soft. Soft screws hold much better than a hard screw, but they will strip much easier.

If I had my wishes, all screws on a gun for things like scope mounting/rings and takedown screws (common use) would be torx head.

Clint

#19 gmcfixer

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Posted 08 February 2007 - 12:41 AM

If I had my wishes, all screws on a gun for things like scope mounting/rings and takedown screws (common use) would be torx head.

Clint

Torx, Tamperproof Torx or Torx Plus? :D

Of course I know what you mean, just reading your post reminded me of a week ago when I had to go track down the Snap-on dealer. I had to change out a camshaft position actuator on a 07 Impala with the new 3.5 liter motor. They went and used a Torx Plus fastener on the bolts that hold the darn thing on (nothing else in there uses them) and to get the torque right you really do need to use the correct Torx Plus socket on it. BTW Torx Plus for those who don't know have wider splines. Had to shell out 26 bucks for the darn socket, nobody else in town had the darn things and the dealer was on the other side of town at the time and I needed it NOW.

Dave Z

#20 Pdwight

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Posted 08 February 2007 - 01:09 AM

Torx Plus



Well I learn something new everyday. :D



Thanks Dave
A hundred years from now it will not matter what my bank account was, the sort of house I lived in, or the kind of car I drove. But the world may be different, because I was important in the life of a child.

for Zach, Everett, and Lilly




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